Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
About MyParkinsonsTeam
Real members of MyParkinsonsTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

The Doctor Diagnosed My Husband With Parkinsonism? Does Anyone Else Have That?

The Doctor Diagnosed My Husband With Parkinsonism? Does Anyone Else Have That?

A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

Some good articles about msa http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/msa/detail_m...
https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/multiple...

Treatment:
here is no specific treatment for MSA. Treatment is aimed at controlling the symptoms of the disease. Drugs that are used to treat people with Parkinson’s disease, most notably levodopa (given in tablets of Sinemet), may also be prescribed for individuals with MSA. However, the effectiveness of such medications varies greatly among affected individuals. In many cases, individuals do not respond or respond poorly to such therapy. Approximately 1/3 of affected individuals respond to levodopa therapy. However, in most cases, the effectiveness of this therapy decreases over time. In addition, these drugs must be used with caution because they may lower blood pressure.

edited, originally posted over 5 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

From http://parkinsonsaction.org/about-pan/parkinson...
This article gives a good summary of the difference.

Parkinsonism is the clinical definition of a variety of different underlying pathologies that can cause Parkinson’s-like symptoms such as slowing of movement, tremor, rigidity or stiffness, and balance problems. There are a number of disorders that can produce the symptoms referred to as Parkinsonisms; Parkinson’s disease is just one of them.

So, what’s the difference between being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and having what are known as Parkinsonisms? According to Dr. Dickson the typical Parkinson’s patient has Lewy bodies (aggregates of a protein called alpha-synuclein) in the brain’s neurons. When that patient is given dopamine replacement therapy (e.g., Sinemet), those symptoms go away.

By contrast, Parkinsonisms – also sometimes referred to as atypical Parkinson’s –have features in addition to typical Parkinson’s disease symptoms, and those symptoms do not respond to dopamine replacement therapy.

edited, originally posted over 5 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

Hi - I have a Parkinsons other type of illness called Multiple System Atrophy or MSA. I know the different kinds are treated differently. I don't know much about it.

posted over 5 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

My husband is being treated for Parkinson

posted almost 6 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

I do.

posted almost 6 years ago
Already a Member? Log in
MyParkinsonsTeam My Parkinson's disease Team

Thank you for signing up.

close