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Antipsychotic Drugs (Quetiapine) Can Be Harmful For People With Parkinson's

Antipsychotic Drugs (Quetiapine) Can Be Harmful For People With Parkinson's

Antipsychotic drugs (Quetiapine) may be harmful for people with Parkinson's by Yvette Brazier March 22, 2016

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/308163...

Antipsychotic drugs that are commonly prescribed for people with Parkinson's disease may be causing additional harm, says research reported in JAMA Neurology. Around 1 million Americans are estimated to be living with Parkinson's, and physicians diagnose 60,000 new cases each year,… read more

A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

Any medication can cause side effects. No twio people tolerate them the same. It's always best to check with your doctor. However, here's a link with a lot of information.

http://www.parkinson.org/understanding-parkinso...

posted about 4 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

As we all know every drug has side affects and each person reacts differently. You and your Doctor should work together as a team so you should question him her if you are concerned about any drug. I personally always Have my pharmacist review any New drug for me. They Have found errors 3 times and remember anytime another Doctor prescribes any med. you need to call your neurologist to see if you can take it. Getting late and talking to much. Goodnight, Bonnie

posted about 4 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

Hi @A MyParkinsonsTeam Member

I found an amazing organization for LBD Lewy Bodies with diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s

https://www.lbda.org/category/3437/what-is-lbd.htm

LBD is not a rare disease. It affects an estimated 1.4 million individuals and their families in the United States. Because LBD symptoms can closely resemble other more commonly known diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, it is currently widely underdiagnosed. Many doctors or other medical professionals still are not familiar with LBD.

LBD is an umbrella term for two related diagnoses. LBD refers to both Parkinson’s disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies. The earliest symptoms of these two diseases differ, but reflect the same underlying biological changes in the brain. Over time, people with both diagnoses will develop very similar cognitive, physical, sleep, and behavioral symptoms.

While it may take more than a year or two for enough symptoms to develop for a doctor to diagnose LBD, it is critical to pursue a formal diagnosis. Early diagnosis allows for important early treatment that may extend quality of life and independence.

LBD is a multisystem disease and typically requires a comprehensive treatment approach. This approach involves a team of physicians from different specialties who collaborate to provide optimum treatment of each symptom without worsening other LBD symptoms. Many people with LBD enjoy significant improvement of their symptoms with a comprehensive approach to treatment, and some can have remarkably little change from year to year.

Some people with LBD are extremely sensitive or may react negatively to certain medications used to treat Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s in addition to certain over-the-counter medications.

- See more at: https://www.lbda.org/category/3437/what-is-lbd....

Published on Jan 28, 2016 YouTube Video on Lewy Symptoms

The event featured world-renown experts discussing the progress made in disease research along with the barriers to developing diagnostic tools and symptomatic therapies. The panel, moderated by Thomas Montine, MD, PhD (University of Washington) included: Ian McKeith, MD, FRCPsych, F Med Sci, Newcastle University, Dabra Babcock, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, John Duda, MD, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Cyrus Zabetian, MD, MS, University of Washington, and Lawrence Friedhoff, MD, PhD, FACP, Axovant.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvU2f8-3Smo&amp...

posted about 4 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

In my opinion antipsychotic drugs can be harmful to a lot of people PD or not. My son was forced to take antipsychotic drugs for drug psychosis. He ended up at 36 grossly obese,PD symtoms, border line type 2 sugar on top of his addiction. He suicided one day before his 37th birthday. Dr's are too willing to diagnose some sort of disorder and hand out drugs and more drugs to treat side affects.

posted about 4 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

@My husband took Quetiapine for a short time for hallucinations & it made it worse I think. The support group I went to there husbands took it also. They told me to get him off of it. He still has hallucinations & is diagonised with PD dementia. Nothing is helping it. The Donepezil he's taking seemed to help some.

posted about 4 years ago
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