Does sleepiness mean you shouldn't drive?

Does sleepiness mean you shouldn't drive?

My husband falls asleep at the drop of a hat. He thinks he should be able to drive. I feel this would be very dangerous. Your thoughts please!

A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

I am shocked and appalled that some people think its okay if you only fall asleep in certain places or just once in a while. It's selfish to care more about your own pride than the safety of yourself, your family and strangers on the road. I know also that for younger people, like my husband, you have to drive to work and back, but when my husband was having a real problem with drowsiness, I drove him. He hated it. It's one of the things family has to do for each other in a bad situation like this. I have had my heart in my mouth on more occasions than I care to remember, while my husband veered all over the road, fell asleep, slowed down to 50 in the fast lane because he was dozing (although he denied it), and lurched forward because of his jerking leg, getting us much too close for comfort to the car in front of us , narrowly missing rear-ending somebody. It only takes ONE time to kill yourself or others. Please think about it and do what you can not to drive, if indeed you doze off at the wheel and can't control the wheel and gas pedal.

posted 8 months ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

My Dad gave up driving in the last 6 months, but he had us to drive him around and do his errands for him. The year before that he only drove up to the local shops..... but he was 94 by then and slowing down a bit anyway.

The progression was gradual... from no more driving at night at 90 to .. no more 4 hour return trips to the city at 92... then just to the local shops 93 and 94 and finally did not renew his licence when he was turning 95. I don't know how old you others are.... but it would be much harder for a younger person to give up driving. My Dad is no longer a young man.

posted about 1 year ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

We had just the same concern. In our area we have a driving assessment centre. We booked him in and got a cancellation. The report was really embarrassing. So he had to stop. At least it wasn’t the family telling my husband to stop and he couldn’t hold it against us. I am sure a driving school would be able to give a valid opinion. All the best. C.

posted over 1 year ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

As someone who was a provincial officer, I have unfortunately had to attend many fatality accidents where the fault was due to fatigue or falling asleep at the wheel, regardless of the reason why they are tired. It enrages me to read that anyone would feel it ok to get behind the wheel and drive knowing they could fall asleep!! How would you feel if you dozed or reared of the road for a second causing someone else to swerve to avoid you with them getting into a serious collision, killing someones daughter, wife, grandmother, husband etc while you drive off unaware of the carnage you have created? I've had to tell families their child was killed, seen unspeakable sights of what happens to a body killed or mamed in a car crash. I don't say accident because going behind the wheel knowing you are tired is a choice you make. I agree with the wife above. If you want to risk your own life, your choice. but you don't have the right to choose to risk someone else's health and safety. My husband has PD and is still able to drive safely for short distances to work. We are both still in our early 50s and We've had an honest conversation about the fact he may not be safe to drive at one point. We live in an area with no transit so means we will have to either rely on me being able to drive, taking a taxi or selling our house and moving closer into the city. Sucks, but at least we will both have a clean consience knowing we won't hurt anyone. I say we, because families and friends who turn a blind eye are just as liable and guilty for turning a blind eye. I know it's hard to give up independence, but please think about the consequences.

posted 8 months ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

Used to be I’d get in the car and drive, alone, 700 miles, stopping only for gas and bathroom breaks. Those days are gone. I have been lucky that the times I’ve fallen asleep at the wheel,doing 75 mph and under the influence of Mirapex, it’s been on highways equipped with rumble strips on the shoulders. No way am I ready to give up driving but I have to face facts. So while I’m good for local errands or a quick trip to the airport I limit my road trip driving to 30-40 minutes, and never after lunch. And no matter the hour I’ll try to slam down three or four cups of coffee before driving. My wife has always preferred doing most of the driving anyway.

posted over 1 year ago
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