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Does Sleepiness Mean You Shouldn't Drive?

Does Sleepiness Mean You Shouldn't Drive?

My husband falls asleep at the drop of a hat. He thinks he should be able to drive. I feel this would be very dangerous. Your thoughts please!

A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

I pull over every 2 hours if on long trip. And have a nap or just rest away from car. If I feel tired in between stops, then pull over asap,and rest/nap

posted almost 2 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

I get tired a mind when I have to drive to Perth here in Western Australia it's a 3 hour drive. I drive so far and when I start feeling tired I pull over, put my seat back and have a snooze lol. Sometimes it's only 30 minutes or it can be an hour. I allow for this and stay at my son's over night , then do the same on way home. But I've had to stop my meds for a little while there and no way could I drive for more than 30 minutes. So I suppose it depends if you know your body and trust yourself

posted almost 2 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

I am shocked and appalled that some people think its okay if you only fall asleep in certain places or just once in a while. It's selfish to care more about your own pride than the safety of yourself, your family and strangers on the road. I know also that for younger people, like my husband, you have to drive to work and back, but when my husband was having a real problem with drowsiness, I drove him. He hated it. It's one of the things family has to do for each other in a bad situation like this. I have had my heart in my mouth on more occasions than I care to remember, while my husband veered all over the road, fell asleep, slowed down to 50 in the fast lane because he was dozing (although he denied it), and lurched forward because of his jerking leg, getting us much too close for comfort to the car in front of us , narrowly missing rear-ending somebody. It only takes ONE time to kill yourself or others. Please think about it and do what you can not to drive, if indeed you doze off at the wheel and can't control the wheel and gas pedal.

posted over 2 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

We had just the same concern. In our area we have a driving assessment centre. We booked him in and got a cancellation. The report was really embarrassing. So he had to stop. At least it wasn’t the family telling my husband to stop and he couldn’t hold it against us. I am sure a driving school would be able to give a valid opinion. All the best. C.

posted over 3 years ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

I got my license back after many letters even though the consultant said I was ok to drive they insisted on a further report by my doctor.
Once I start driving I am alert and don't have a problem with PD if I do then I will give up driving.
I have had to give up ski-ing darts and golf through PD I certainly do not want to give up my independence.just yet.

posted 10 months ago
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