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On Carba-levo - Have You Been Told That The Brain "gets Used" To It And It's Effectiveness Ca Start Wearing Off?

On Carba-levo - Have You Been Told That The Brain "gets Used" To It And It's Effectiveness Ca Start Wearing Off?

A doctor told me this. I haven't heard it elsewhere so I'm wondering if anyone else has heard it?

It's not the same as it causing dyskinesas. Instead, it's that the synopses getting used to the chemical, and it stops working as well.

The idea also wasn't about CL working less well because the PD has advanced.

A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

It is true that over time, people with PD tend to need to take more carbidopa/levodopa. The reason for this is that as progression of PD takes place, there are fewer dopaminergic neurons in the brain that can produce their own dopamine. A person with PD tends to need more medication containing dopamine over time to compensate for these changes. Therefore, needing more carbidopa/levodopa over time does not mean that the medication is no longer working, it means that the disease is changing.

In addition, as PD progresses, a person may start to develop more symptoms that are not responsive to carbidopa/levodopa. Carbidopa/levodopa best treats the motor symptoms of PD – mostly slowness, stiffness, and tremor. Some motor symptoms, such as balance problems, do not respond as well to carbidopa/levodopa. Non-motor symptoms including fatigue, depression, sleep problems, cognitive difficulties, variations in blood pressure, urinary problems, and constipation, also do not respond to carbidopa/levodopa and may cause more disability over time than motor problems. The perception may be that over time, carbidopa/levodopa is not effective, when in fact new symptoms developed that carbidopa/levodopa can’t treat.
Read more --> https://www.apdaparkinson.org/article/common-qu...

posted 16 days ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

Hi @A MyParkinsonsTeam Member,
Not to pile disrespect on your Dr., but it is a fact that he/she doesn't understand PD medications. if your Dr. thinks that CL stops working because "the brain's gotten used to the drug"., and told you that, you should look for a new Dr. that is a Movement Disorder Specialist and understands the medication they are prescribing for you. As I quoted from Dr. Gilbert at APDA "as progression of PD takes place, there are fewer dopaminergic neurons in the brain that can produce their own dopamine. A person with PD tends to need more medication containing dopamine over time to compensate for these changes. Therefore, needing more carbidopa/levodopa over time does not mean that the medication is no longer working, it means that the disease is changing."

posted 16 days ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

Yes, it does. My dad eventually had to get the DBS as the medication was not so useful.

posted 5 days ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

Yes, we were given that information. Holding off on increasing dosage for that reason.

posted 12 days ago
A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

Theo,
I also found CL was inducing some of the same symptoms that are reported with PD, so it was backfiring (such as cognitive, fatigue, restlessleg...). Turns out it was too much CL.

Doctor assured that when it's more advanced, patients tend to tolerate the CL better. I'm hoping by then, there's other treatments...

Instead of CL, we're switching the the neupro patch at 1mg to add to the rasagiline. I only need an tad more than rasagline keeps around. I'll see how that goes.

My main feature is tremors.

edited, originally posted 6 days ago
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