Patience: Accepting That Control Requires Self-Care | MyParkinsonsTeam

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Patience: Accepting That Control Requires Self-Care

Posted on August 9, 2018

"A waiting person is a patient person." - Henri J.M. Nouwen

Argh! Have you ever felt impatient at a red light, or irritated at the end of a long line for your prescription at the pharmacy? You're not alone.

Patience can feel scarce when you don't have control over a situation. It can feel like psoriasis interrupts your life and brings a slew of frustrations at the worst moments. Finding a tiny bit of control can bring us patience later.

Control might look like self-care: a walk around the block, getting up early for 15 minutes of alone time, spending time each week encouraging others who have psoriasis or starting a gratitude journal. Don't let anyone (including yourself!) make you feel guilty for taking care of yourself.

Here are some conversations on MyParkinsonsTeam about patience:

"It is so hard to be patient when you are tired and hurting yourself. But when they drop things on the floor and you have to pick it up... Oh sure, you've told them ten thousand times to not do that. It's frustrating, I know. But take a deep breath and remember, they cannot help themselves. Take a deep breath, relax, walk in the other room, then come back and do what you need to do. You love them, remember that. Remember the good times. Remember the fun and laughter you used to have. Remember all the fond, loving moments."

"I think our biggest challenge is patience - at least mine was. I wanted the medication to be magic pills. I refused to accept the fact that I was going to have falls and limitations to my activities. I was looking at using a walker as a sign of weakness... boy was I wrong. My walker is now my best friend and now I see it as a sign of a will to live a full life to my limit."

"Patience is going to be a good thing put to use for anyone dealing with movement disorders. Someone on this website gave some good advice- 'What's the hurry!' As a wife and caregiver for Harold, I am continually trying to repeat that for myself. I try to do short tasks while waiting for him to move himself to the next schedule. I don't have a good solution, but love & caring responses help tremendously."

Have you found ways to take back control and practice patience? What do you do to be more open to self-care? Share your insights in the comments below or directly on MyPsoriasisTeam.com.

Posted on August 9, 2018
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