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Behavioral Changes and Parkinson's

Updated on October 04, 2021
Medically reviewed by
Ariel D. Teitel, M.D., M.B.A.
Article written by
Lorelei Tucker, Ph.D.

People often think of Parkinson’s disease as simply a movement disorder, but it also has nonmotor symptoms. Many people living with Parkinson’s display behaviors that are troubling to the person and their family. These behavioral changes can be a symptom of Parkinson’s, or they may be a side effect of medication.

Members of MyParkinsonsTeam have shared many experiences that range from annoying to life-threatening. Some people with Parkinson’s disease struggle with anger or impulsive behavior that can impact their friends and family members. Others have hallucinations that cause them to act in ways that don’t make sense to their caregivers. In addition, attention and motivation problems are common and make everyday tasks harder. These behavioral changes can sometimes impact quality of life and put people with Parkinson’s in danger.

Fortunately, there are treatments that can help. With careful monitoring and support from loved ones, people living with Parkinson’s disease can manage these behavior symptoms and sometimes even use the symptoms to their advantage.

Impulsivity and Obsessive Behaviors in Parkinson’s Disease

One of the most startling changes for people with Parkinson’s are impulse control disorders and obsessive behaviors. Some people start gambling or overspending, for example. One MyParkinsonsTeam member stayed up all night shopping and bought 10 surfboards in a short amount of time.

Many members of MyParkinsonsTeam have also found that their sex drive skyrocketed. One member said their increasing sexual needs were too much for their wife and strained their marriage. Another member, however, was happy with their "wonderful post-menopausal sexual awakening."

Some behavioral changes are similar to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms and can cause real problems for people living with Parkinson’s. For example, a member said their husband started taking things apart and putting them back together, which became a problem when it led to $3,500 in repair bills. Other times, the obsessive behaviors can be productive, like renewed artistic creativity. One member began making wooden flags to sell, giving some earnings to organizations for veterans.

How Common Are Impulsivity and Obsessive Behaviors in Parkinson’s?

About 14 percent of people living with Parkinson’s experience obsessive and impulsive behaviors.

What Is the Stage of Onset for Impulsivity and Obsessive Behaviors in Parkinson’s?

Impulse control disorders and symptoms of OCD tend to show up after a person begins treatment with dopamine agonist medications such as Requip (ropinirole) and Mirapex (pramipexole dihydrochloride). Impulsive behaviors are especially common in people who are taking both a dopamine agonist and Rytary (levodopa/carbidopa).

What Causes Impulsivity and Obsessive Behaviors in Parkinson’s?

These side effects likely develop because of how Parkinson’s medications affect dopamine in the brain. Parkinson’s disease damages dopaminergic neurons — cells that produce dopamine. Sometimes called the “pleasure chemical,” dopamine is a neurotransmitter produced in the brain. It is important for movement and the reward system that helps control motivation.

Dopamine agonist drugs act like dopamine in the brain, and the body turns levodopa into dopamine. The increased activity of dopamine in the brain helps with motor dysfunction, but it also boosts the reward system, which may cause obsessive symptoms and impulsive behaviors in Parkinson’s. The use of dopamine agonists such as ropinirole have been linked to increased risk-taking behavior and gambling.

How Are Impulsivity and Obsessive Behaviors in Parkinson’s Treated?

Decreasing or removing treatment with the dopamine agonist and switching to levodopa extended-release medication often helps to alleviate these symptoms. Support groups for impulsive behaviors such as gambling may also help.

Apathy in Parkinson’s

People experiencing feelings of apathy lose interest in things they previously enjoyed and may have blunted reactions to what would otherwise be moments of joy, sadness, or anger. Experiencing apathy can be distressing for the person living with Parkinson’s and their loved ones.

MyParkinsonsTeam members have shared some of their experiences with Parkinson’s-related apathy. One member said, “I find myself to be apathetic these last few months. Not in the sense of unmotivated or bored. It’s more like feeling numb. Little do I care if things go wrong. Likewise, I fail to muster happiness when wonderful things happen, like the birth of a baby. I used to feel both joy and sorrow quite intensely.” Another member responded saying that they could barely muster enthusiasm when their daughter announced she was pregnant.

How Common Is Apathy in Parkinson’s Disease?

Up to 60 percent of people living with Parkinson’s disease will experience apathy at some point in the course of disease progression.

What Is the Stage of Onset of Apathy in Parkinson’s?

Some people with Parkinson’s begin losing interest in activities early in progression before they are initially diagnosed with the disease.

What Causes Apathy in Parkinson’s?

The root cause of apathy in Parkinson’s is unclear. Apathy is a common symptom of depression, and 35 percent of people with Parkinson’s experience depression or depression-like symptoms. However, many people with Parkinson’s who don’t have depression do experience apathy, so there isn’t a clear cause-and-effect relationship. Apathy may be due to changes in reward centers in the brain.

How Is Apathy in Parkinson’s Treated?

If a person is experiencing other depressive symptoms, treating their depressive symptoms with psychotherapy and medication may help with some apathy. The most common antidepressants prescribed to people with Parkinson’s are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), like those given for other depressive disorders. Treatment with the dopamine agonist piribedil may also help.

Panic Attacks and Irritability in Parkinson’s Disease

Anxiety during Parkinson’s can contribute to irritability and outbursts that can hurt people with Parkinson’s and their loved ones. A MyParkinsonsTeam member said they developed new intense jealousy and panic attacks when they couldn’t reach their husband by phone. Another member said that their husband’s irritability has led them to fight nearly every day. The increased irritability compounds the stress that people with Parkinson’s are feeling, and it can exacerbate other behavioral symptoms and interpersonal conflict.

How Common Are Panic Attacks and Irritability in Parkinson’s?

Between 20 percent and 50 percent of people with Parkinson’s disease develop issues with anxiety.

What Is the Stage of Onset for Panic Attacks and Irritability in Parkinson’s?

Anxiety issues tend to begin early in disease progression and may worsen over time.

What Causes Panic Attacks and Irritability in Parkinson’s?

Scientists aren’t sure whether panic and irritability are caused directly by Parkinson’s disease or by comorbid mood disorders like depression and anxiety disorder.

How Are Panic Attacks and Irritability in Parkinson’s Treated?

Some MyParkinsonsTeam members recommended lifestyle changes like living separately or stepping away when an argument escalates. For some people, antianxiety medication like benzodiazepines can help with these symptoms, as can cognitive behavioral therapy.

Hallucinations and Psychosis in Parkinson’s Disease

Troubling neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson’s disease include hallucinations and psychosis. People experiencing hallucinations may see things that aren’t there, hear voices, or feel an unseen presence. One MyParkinsonsTeam member said that “shadows become demons and spirits.” Another member’s husband began having delusions that they had invited people over when the couple had not even spoken to them.

How Common Are Hallucinations and Psychosis in Parkinson’s?

The prevalence of hallucinations depends on the type. Visual hallucinations occur in 22 percent to 38 percent of people with Parkinson’s. Meanwhile, auditory hallucinations occur in up to 22 percent of cases.

What Is the Stage of Onset for Hallucinations and Psychosis in Parkinson’s?

Hallucinations can begin in the early or later stages of the disease and may increase with severity over time. People experiencing hallucinations prior to 5.5 years in the course of disease typically have more pronounced early motor disturbances and are on high doses of medications. Hallucinations and psychosis that develop in the later phases tend to be associated with cognitive decline.

What Causes Hallucinations and Psychosis in Parkinson’s?

The source of psychosis isn’t entirely understood. However, changes to important brain structures could be partially responsible. Some cases of psychosis may be caused by long-term treatment with dopaminergic medication. Deep brain stimulation surgery may also worsen existing psychotic symptoms in some people.

How Are Hallucinations and Psychosis in Parkinson’s Treated?

Treatment for Parkinson’s-related psychosis can involve adding antipsychotic medication or reducing the dose of dopaminergic drugs. Regardless, people experiencing these symptoms need careful attention and support from their loved ones and health care providers to prevent them from potentially harming themselves.

Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s Disease

Cognitive impairment and dementia are common in progressive neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Unlike cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease, however, people living with Parkinson’s experience issues with planning, attention, and motivation earlier than problems with memory.

A few MyParkinsonsTeam members have talked about forgetting the day of the week and how surprised they were when they checked the calendar. Others have mentioned losing important items like keys and phones.

How Common Is Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s?

Between 18 percent and 41 percent of people with Parkinson’s develop dementia or some form of cognitive decline.

What Is the Stage of Onset of Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s?

Up to 20 percent of people living with Parkinson’s already had mild cognitive impairment at the time of diagnosis. However, it can take up to 20 years for this impairment to advance to dementia.

What Causes Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s?

The root cause of impaired cognition in Parkinson’s is unclear. It may be caused by the neurology of the disease. Scientists have found that sleep issues and poor REM sleep are common in Parkinson’s and are associated with cognitive decline and dementia.

How Is Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s Treated?

Physicians may prescribe medications such as Namenda (memantine) and recommend regular neuropsychiatric evaluations to see if cognitive symptoms are worsening.

Tips for Managing Behavioral Changes in Parkinson’s

Guidance from medical professionals is crucial, but advice from other people with Parkinson’s can make the difference between living and thriving. The following are suggestions from MyParkinsonsTeam members to manage the behavioral changes in Parkinson’s disease.

  • Find healthy outlets to channel obsessive behaviors, such as art, woodworking, music, or video games.
  • Educate yourself and your loved ones so that others can help identify and manage behavioral symptoms and mood changes.
  • If you’re a caregiver or loved one of a person with Parkinson’s, be patient and pick your battles. Step away if possible to clear your head before engaging.
  • Take your medications on time and with a meal or snack if advised. Make sure you take your medication as prescribed, and tell your medical team if you have any side effects.
  • If behavioral or personality changes make living arrangements with your spouse too tricky, consider separate living arrangements.
  • If you have Parkinson’s, be kind to yourself. If your loved one has it, give them grace while also taking care of your needs and well-being.
  • It’s tough to go it alone, so find in-person and online support groups. MyParkinsonsTeam is an excellent place to start.

Talk With Others Who Understand

MyParkinsonsTeam is the social network for people with Parkinson’s disease and their loved ones. On MyParkinsonsTeam, more than 79,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with Parkinson’s disease.

Have something to add to the conversation? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on MyParkinsonsTeam.

References
  1. Mood: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease — Parkinson’s Foundation
  2. Impulsive and Compulsive Behaviours in Parkinson’s disease — Annual Review of Clinical Psychology
  3. Dopaminergic Dysregulation, Artistic Expressiveness, and Parkinson’s Disease — Case Reports in Neurology
  4. Impulse Control Disorders and Compulsive Behaviors Associated With Dopaminergic Therapies in Parkinson Disease — Neurology Clinical Practice
  5. The Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease With Dopamine Agonists — GMS Health Technology Assessment
  6. Parkinson’s Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment — American Family Physician
  7. Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease — Journal of Neural Transmission (Vienna)
  8. Pathological Gambling in Parkinson's Disease: What Are the Risk Factors and What Is the Role of Impulsivity? — The European Journal of Neuroscience
  9. Non-Motor Features of Parkinson Disease — Nature Reviews. Neuroscience
  10. Psychiatric Manifestation in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease — Journal of Korean Medical Science
  11. Current Treatment of Behavioral and Cognitive Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease — Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
  12. Anxiety in Parkinson’s Disease: Identification and Management — Therapeutic Advances in Neurological Disorders
  13. Anxiety Disorders and Depressive Disorders Preceding Parkinson’s Disease: A Case-Control Study — Movement Disorders
  14. Psychosis in Parkinson’s Disease — Postgraduate Medical Journal
  15. Behavioral Changes Associated With Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery for Parkinson’s Disease — Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
  16. Behavioral Disturbances in Parkinson’s Disease — Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience
  17. Profile of Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson’s Disease — Brain Pathology
  18. Global Cognitive Performance Is Associated With Sleep Efficiency Measured by Polysomnography in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease — Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences

A MyParkinsonsTeam Member said:

You have a reason other wise the tears wouldn't be there. You've just got find out why and honor them. Good or bad.
Love Susan

posted 1 day ago

hug

Ariel D. Teitel, M.D., M.B.A. is the clinical associate professor of medicine at the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Learn more about him here.
Lorelei Tucker, Ph.D. has a doctorate in neuroscience from Augusta University. Learn more about her here.

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